An Apple a Day

Remember that time I started a food blog over the summer and then the fall semester started and I had zero time to keep up with it? Whoops. Well, I’m back. And, per usual, putting off homework for a couple minutes to share an awesome food-related adventure from this past weekend.

I don’t know if it’s just me, but it seems like this fall in particular, all of a sudden apple picking was THE cute weekend thing to do. Between all the Instagrams, tweets, and Facebook posts I’ve seen, it’s like all of my social media outlets have become one continuous L.L. Bean fall catalogue.

So. Much. Plaid.

FYSOP reunion! (note all the plaid)

FYSOP reunion! (note all the plaid)

I obviously had to jump on the hay-filled bandwagon and figure out how to get out of the city and to one of the many nearby(ish) apple farms. The problem, of course, is that nobody here has a car and the commuter rail didn’t seem like a viable option. So it was looking like it was a no-go. But then, *cue heaven/angelic music* CAS Student Government saved the day by organizing a group trip out to Belkin Family Lookout Farm in Natick. Did I care that I’m not even in CAS? Nope.

IMG_1023

For just $7:

  • I got to ride a school bus (flashback to the good ol’ McDonogh days) with a bunch of college kids (who are too tall for those seats by the way—even my 5-foot self was cramped) dressed in plaid
  • I got a clear plastic bag for my apples (which, we came to find out, could fit either 6 or 2 apples depending on if you chose monstrous ones like I did or baby ones like Hannah/Nikki)
  • I got about 23402938 potential new Facebook profile pictures out of the day #DIFTP (#doitforthephoto)

In conclusion, the experience was priceless (cue Mastercard advertisement).

Nommm.

Nommm.

Big apples vs baby apples. Photo cred: Steph

Big apples vs baby apples. Photo cred: Steph

Let me begin by saying how great it was to get out of the city for a few hours. I absolutely love Boston, but sometimes we forget how beautiful suburbia can be. Driving through the town of Wellesley, we were ooh-ing and ahhh-ing at the fall foliage (the city is a couple weeks behind the suburbs as far as leaves changing colors go) as if we have never before seen an orange tree. I equate this scenario to when you see a baby/child in the dining hall or anywhere at BU—since we are literally always around people our own age, it’s funny how noticeable it is when you see a baby and suddenly realize you haven’t seen anyone under age 18 in however many months (I blame this odd metaphor on a BuzzFeed I just read that obviously involved cute babies).

After a 40ish-minute drive, we pulled up to the farm, received our tiny plastic apple bags, and got in line for the ‘train’ that takes farm visitors to various designated stops throughout the 180 acres. The ride, completely surrounded by vines upon vines of plump, wine-smelling grapes was definitely a highlight. We got off at the first ‘stop’ and made our way into the rows upon rows of 60,000 perfectly aligned trees organized by type. Immediately we started picking and eating the apples, myself included (despite my OCD and not having a sink to wash them in—eek!).

How cute are we?!

How cute are we?!

Grapes everywhere!

Grapes everywhere!

We made our way through many different rows to sample various types of apples, Asian pears, grapes, and even peaches (Nikki was The Most Pleased about the peach situation, even having to do away with some of her apples to make room).

Nikki rearranges her bags to make room for the peaches (very last of the season) we discovered on our way out!

Nikki rearranges her bags to make room for the peaches (very last of the season) we discovered on our way out!

What we didn’t know ahead of time, however, was that the Farm was full of entertainment aside from apple picking. The last stop on the train was the Children’s Play Area which contained farm animals, face painting, a maze, a hay pyramid, hay rides, camel riding (guess what day it is?!), a playground, and food. We obviously participated in most of the aforementioned activities #YOLO.

Jeremy, Hannah, and Nikki are only slightly excited.

Jeremy, Hannah, and Nikki are only slightly excited.

Hay pyramid

Hay pyramid

"mikemikemikemikemike"

“mikemikemikemikemike”

We fit just fine.

We fit just fine.

Nikki and Steph got their faces painted.

Nikki and Steph got their faces painted.

Once the Children’s Play Area had tired us all out and we’d worked up quite an appetite (clearly the 234291038 apples didn’t fill us up for very long), we took the lovely train back to the entrance where the farm’s store was located. After one final pumpkin-filled photoshoot, we bought apple cider and apple cider donuts and went outside to a picnic table to enjoy the apple-themed snack before the buses were to head back to the city. The cider was essentially autumn in a cup, refreshing after the long day. And perfect to wash down the cakey donut whose cinnamon sugar managed to completely coat my fingers as well as the picnic table surrounding me. It was worth the mess.

Family photo.

Family photo.

Apple cider + cider donuts=perfection.

Apple cider + cider donuts=perfection.

We then had to say bye to Lookout Farm as we rode back to BU, peach/apple-filled bags resting on our laps the whole way.

While one can obviously just eat apples nonstop for two weeks post-apple picking, we thought it would be fun to at least use a small portion of them in an apple-themed meal. So the next day, I went to Nikki and Hannah’s apartment in the swanky Student Village II (my poor microfridge wasn’t gonna cut it) for dinner. The menu you ask?

-Apple and goat cheese salad

-Apple-maple chicken

-Apple crisp

Apples on apples on apples.

Apples on apples on apples.

Needless to say, there were still plenty of apples leftover.

the giving tree

Advertisements

2 responses

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s